Tim D.'s Story

Tulsa / Broken Arrow, OK

My wife and I "celebrated" our 38th wedding anniversary while she was on a ventilator for 8 days already. She passed away 5 days after that.

They were almost constantly injecting something into her body to compensate for the last injection.

The Hospital

“It seemed like the nurses and doctors were unable to explain why she had progressed from stable one day to needing a ventilator the next day.”

My wife and I "celebrated" our 38th wedding anniversary while she was on a ventilator for 8 days already. She passed away 5 days after that. I was only able to be with her the last 3 days but in that time at the hospital I observed a series of actions that seemed to be nothing short of damage control. It seemed like the nurses and doctors were unable to explain why she had progressed from stable one day to needing a ventilator the next day. They were almost constantly injecting something into her body to compensate for the last injection or lack of reaction to the last treatment. And then they warned me of the potential of dialysis if the Lasix they were trying wasn't accepted by her kidneys. That call came on her last day.


Let me start at the beginning first, on August 6th, 2021 we had been out to dinner with family and Laurie had a slight cough for a few days, but overall felt OK. Just to frame her overall condition prior to getting the virus, she was 59 years old, overweight and had type 2 diabetes, so she felt like she had a Covid-target on her back already. In the past she has had some respiratory issues like sinus infections that turned into bronchitis, occasionally developing into pneumonia. This had been going on for years. Neither of us have had any Covid vaccinations - never felt like it was safe at all.


So, when we got home from dinner that evening and she started to cough worse, followed by a fever overnight, I was concerned but we had been here before. The difference this time was we had a pulse oximeter (a cheap one that I questioned the accuracy of)


Seeking Treatment


After taking care of her for 2 days, I could feel the virus was now in me too as I started fever and chilling while sleeping that night. All I could do was sleep as my energy level was gone. I would get her fluids as I could, but she was also taking care of herself. Day 4 she decided to drive herself to get a Covid test so that she could get some medications prescribed if possible. She had been internet searching and knew what prescriptions she thought would help because she had found America's Frontline website for her information. So, she drove all the way to town (35 miles) got tested and came back home. I questioned why she didn't stay at the hospital, and she said she didn't want to, not comfortable trusting the process. She told me once she got her test results, she could get Ivermectin, HCQ and would probably get better. The next day there were no test results yet and her oxygen levels were getting too low and she was getting scared. I couldn't help her at all at that point. So, she drove herself back to Tulsa and checked herself into St. Francis Hospital South in Tulsa/Broken Arrow Oklahoma. When we spoke on the phone, I was actually comforted when they said they would have to keep her for 10-11 days. I was glad someone was taking care of her because I could not.


Remdesivir

“Laurie and I always agreed not to be kept alive like that.”

I now have her medical records and see where they started a 5 day series of Remdesivir injections on the first day she was there. I have researched this a lot and feel like this treatment along with their attitude regarding a non-vaccinated person taking up hospital bed space that a vaccinated person could be using is why she didn't receive "do no harm" style care.


I could provide more personal details of how hard this has been, how hard it was to not be able to be with her, how sick I got (I lost 25 pounds and had respiratory issues for months afterwards), but for now, the point is I believe Laurie died as a result of a protocol that wasn't in response to her particular situation. She would have survived the pneumonia but not with all the fluids her body was retaining. She was very bloated when I got there, had blood clots, was on almost 95% oxygen with mid 80's saturation. Her blood pressure was crazy and her blood sugar levels continued to climb with every test they did at 15 minute intervals. I was still very weak and could not stay with her overnight (plus they didn't recommend me staying), so when they actually called me at home the next morning advising me that dialysis was needed, I stopped the whole operation. Laurie and I always agreed not to be kept alive like that and she made me promise to stop it if it kept going downhill.


Letting Her Go

“The hardest decision in my life but I could not let her suffer anymore.”

She was in the hospital for a total of 20 days, on a ventilator for 13 of those days. The hardest decision in my life but I could not let her suffer anymore, especially when the doctors and nurses were painting a pretty negative outcome.


I can write more later if needed but I truly hope this protocol is exposed for what it is and that no one ever must feel this helpless and untrusting of the medical profession we have grown up expecting to protect us!


Side note - from the hospital, Laurie made me promise to call America's Frontline, schedule an e-visit and get a script for HCQ and Ivermectin called in. I was able to do so and am sure it aided in my recovery, I just wish she could have had the same opportunity.


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